LIGHTING~ David Trubridge

David Trubridge has had a long-standing passion for the environment, deepened by his time at sea.

In 2004 he was selected for the Antarctica Arts Fellowship program, which allowed him to spend several weeks in this remote and ecologically delicate location.

This excursion also provided inspiration for a number of his designs such as Snowflake and Kina.

Wherever possible, all timber is from sustainably managed plantations in New Zealand, or the United States. Wood is left natural where appropriate, with natural non-toxic oils being used in place of harmful solvents.

From a design point of view, the products use only the minimal amount of materials and are generated with a focus on longevity, rather than mimicking quick-moving trends.

 

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I really enjoy the “do it yourself” aspect of these designs also the light cast by the shapes and materials used. This designer has not only considered the aesthetics of his designs but also the environmental impact of manufacturing these light fittings.

I have much respect for designers who are able to work with new and innovative designs whilst prioritizing environmental sustainability even they are often creating more work for themselves in the process.

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https://www.davidtrubridge.com/

http://www.studioitalia.com.au/

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1960s Design~ Psychedelic Culture Wes Wilson

Following the newfound American Dream innocence of the 1950s, the 1960s shattered America’s innocence with the brutality of the Southeast Asia wars, a world-rocking presidential assassination, and a growing racial divide. 

The 60s was the decade of America’s psychedelic movement, when teenagers turned away from the conventionalism of the 50s to experiment with mind-altering drugs. These LSD-inspired distorted perceptions appeared in rock concert posters to express the trippy feelings they were experiencing.

The Major players in  American design were; Wes Wilson, Victor Moscoso,Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol

 

WES WILSON

Between 1966 and 1967, San Francisco rock poster artist Wes Wilson designed posters and handbills for the first Trips Festival, the last show by The Beatles, and dozens of concerts at the Avalon Ballroom and Fillmore Auditorium featuring everyone from The Association to Frank Zappa. Along the way, he defined the psychedelic poster, in which blocks of letters were used to create shapes, which seemed to bend and vibrate in place.

Wes Wilson, the father of the 1960s rock concert poster, came into the world via Sacramento, California on July 15, 1937.  As a child his interests meandered among artistic pursuits and an intense love for the natural world. His post-secondary studies reflected these interests; he focused for a time on forestry and horticulture before eventually coming to philosophy. By the latter half of the 1960s Wes found much inspiration in the avant-garde neighborhoods of San Francisco. Serendipity interrupted all of his plans (as she’s wont to do) and Wes Wilson soon found himself creating fine art for the masses. His style, inspired by the Art Nouveau masters, took what was understood about promotional art and turned it inside-out. Nearly cryptic letters filled every available space, lines melted into lines, colors clashed… and the psychedelic poster was born. The love of art and nature eventually carried Wes away to the beautiful Ozarks foothills, where he still enjoys creating and discussing art and ideas. 

 

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“Are We Next?” from 1965 was a self-published poster printed at West Coast Litho to express, among other things, Wilson’s opposition to the Vietnam War

 

In 1966, Wes Wilson designed this poster for what turned out to be the last concert by The Beatles.

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Australian Wallpaper and Fabric Designer ~ Florence Broadhurst

 

Florence Broadhurst was years ahead of her time, the complex, eccentric and talented Florence Broadhurst was born in rural Queensland, Australia in 1899. By the time of her death in 1977 Broadhurst had lived and worked in Australia, Asia, and England; performed professionally on stage; been befriended by royalty; exhibited her paintings; and started an internationally successful wallpaper company whose success was based upon her own designs.

Adorning the walls, floors and furnishings of London nightclubs, Parisian salons, Cate Blanchett’s family home and even the set of MasterChef are her designs; designs that were created over three decades ago but are still gathering new and passionate fans all over the world.

 

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Florence Broadhurst has put Australia on the map for international design.

A multi-talented legend, Broadhurst expressed herself creatively through multiple mediums, platforms and continents around the world. After winning a singing competition in 1915, Broadhurst started performing in various towns and cities in Queensland. By the early 1920s, she was performing in India, South-East Asia and China. In 1926, Broadhurst founded a modern academy of arts in Shanghai, known as the Broadhurst Academy, offering tuition in violin, pianoforte, voice production, modern ballroom dancing, classical dancing, musical culture and journalism. Never one to settle, Broadhurst moved to London and reinvented herself as Madame Pellier, running a dress salon on Bond Street in 1933.

After spending more than a decade in the United Kingdom, Broadhurst returned to Australia and settled in Sydney where she started painting enthusiastically and prolifically. Transforming her creative talent into a business opportunity, she started a revolutionary wallpaper business in 1959, creating hundreds of unique and luxurious patterns with rich and vibrant colours all perfectly matching her flamboyant personality. By the mid 1960s, her company monopolised the Australian market and started exporting to America, Peru, Paris, the Middle East and Norway. She continued to work actively until her death in 1977 at the age of 78.
In 1977 she was bludgeoned to death with a large piece of timber in her Paddington studio.  The murder was never solved, but there has been some speculation that Broadhurst was a victim of serial killer John Wayne Glover,

 

 

http://www.signatureprints.com.au/products/wallpaper/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence_Broadhurst

~Contemporary French Lingerie~

 

 

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Contemporary Lingerie & Corsetry designs have been strongly inspired by traditional designs.

refer to ” History of Lingerie” blog

Design of lingerie as with all fashion and clothing has been directly influenced by the culture of the day.

As we can see by the images of past to present day clothing and especially lingerie they have been designed with far less fabric, minimalistic craftsmanship and cheaper fabrics / materials i.e.polyster, lycra, elastin compared with pure cottons, silks and satin of days gone by.

Generally speaking modern and more contemporary lingerie shows more flesh to almost nothing  in some instances.

Of course fashion is personal however from my observations quantity and production has taken over quality and design.

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Jean-Paul Gaultier

Coco Chanel

La Perla

Louise Feudalere

 

http://www.louisefeuillere.com/home.html

Chantal Thomass: Photograph by David Prince, Styled by Robyn Glaser

http://www.laperla.com

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=coco+chanel+lingerie&client=safari&rls=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjhhajGi-fTAhWMUrwKHdXNBXMQsAQIMA&biw=1277&bih=833

Issey Miyaki

He is recognized worldwide for his contemporary, industrial and innovative apparel designs, fragrances and exhibitions. His work cuts the edge of science and fashion, combining the two into a harmonizing symphony using unconventional materials.

Issey Miyake was born on April 22, 1938, in Hiroshima, Japan. In the 1960s, he designed for Givenchy in Paris, after which he designed for Geoffrey Beene in Manhattan. In 1970, Miyake started his own design studio. During the 1970s, he toyed with avant-garde Eastern designs. In the 1980s, he began using technology new East meets West textiles. He started Pleats Please in 1993 and A Piece of Cloth in 1999.

In the late 1980s, he began to experiment with new methods of pleating that would allow both flexibility of movement for the wearer as well as ease of care and production. In which the garments are cut and sewn first, then sandwiched between layers of paper and fed into a heat press, where they are pleated. The fabric’s ‘memory’ holds the pleats and when the garments are liberated from their paper cocoon, they are ready-to wear. He did the costume for Ballett Frankfurt with pleats in a piece named “the Loss of Small Detail” William Forsythe and also work on ballet “Garden in the setting”.

Issey Miyake lines and brands
Mr Miyake “oversees the overall direction of all lines created by his company”, even though the individual collections have been designed by his staff since his ‘retirement’ from the fashion world in 1997.

 

Issey Miyake – main collection line, subdivided into men (since 1978/85) and women (since 1971) collections, designed by Dai Fujiwara[7] (succeeded Naoki Takizawa in 2006)
Issey Miyake Fête – colorful women’s line that “draws on the technological innovations of Pleats Please” (Fête means ‘celebration’ in French) (since 2004)
Pleats Please Issey Miyake – polyester jersey garments for women that are first “cut and sewn and then pleated […] (normally, fabric is first pleated and then cut and sewn […])” “to permanently retain washboard rows of horizontal, vertical or diagonal knife-edge pleats.”Miyake patented the technique in 1993
HaaT – women’s line, designed by Miyake’s former textile designer, Makiko Minagawa. HaaT means ‘village market’ in Sanskrit, the word sound similar to ‘heart’ in English
A-POC – 1998- custom-collection for men and women. Tubes of fabric are machine-processed and can be cut into various shapes by the consumer. A-POC is an acronym of ‘a piece of cloth’, and a near homonym of ‘epoch’.
132 5. Issey Miyake – an evolution of the A-POC concept. Works are presented as two-dimensional geometric shapes made from recycled polyethylene terephthalate mixed with natural fibers and dyes, which then unfold into structured garments. (since 2014)
me Issey Miyake – line of “exclusive one-sized shirts that stretch to fit the wearer” that are sold in plastic tube, named Cauliflower for the non-Asian market. (since 2001)
Bao Bao Issey Miyake – line of bags
Issey Miyake Watches – men’s and women’s watches
Issey Miyake Perfumes – line of fragrances for men and women. See below
Evian by Issey Miyake – Limited edition bottle designed by Issey Miyake for Evian water.
Issey Miyake maintains a freestanding store, named ELTTOB TEP Issey Miyake (reverse for ‘Pet Bottle’) in Osaka where the full array of lines is available.
21 21 Design Sight (a play on 20/20 vision) is a museum-style research center for design, constructed by Tadao Ando, that was opened in Roppongi, Tokyo in March 2007. The center is headed by Issey Miyake and four other Japanese designers, and operated by The Miyake Issey Foundation.
The Miyake Issey Foundation, founded in Tokyo in 2004, operates the 21_21 Design Sight center, organizes exhibitions and events, and publishes literature.

Awards
In 2005, he was awarded the Praemium Imperiale for Sculpture.
Miyake won the Arts and Philosophy Kyoto Prize in 2006
Japan’s Order of Culture, 2010
XXIII Premio Compasso d’Oro ADI, 2014, for family of lamps IN-EI Issey Miyake, Artemide.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Issey_Miyake#Issey_Miyake_lines_and_brands

http://www.famousfashiondesigners.org/issey-miyake

http://www.encyclopedia.com/people/literature-and-arts/fashion-biographies/issey-miyake

http://en.vogue.fr/vogue-list/thevoguelist/issey-miyake/970

http://www.http//www.isseymiyake.com/

https://successstory.com/people/miyake-kazumaru-issey-miyake

 

Origins of French Lingerie ~ Traditional Cultural Design

 

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History of Lingerie Fabrics and Lingerie Styles

Lingerie’s unique history traces back to 3000 BC in Egypt. Figurines throughout ancient times suggested different types of undergarments were worn even then. The word Lingerie originated from the French word “linge” meaning “linen” and was not frequently used until the late 1850’s. The soft linen’s during the Middle Ages were worn by nobility for the sheer purpose of modesty, hygiene and warmth. At that time they were bulky, uncomfortable and designed to flatten breasts while contouring the body in a female silhouette. While in the 16th Century a chemise, petticoats and corsets were designed to accentuate the female form, mainly to tease and entice men. It was considered scandalous in those days to even mention the word undergarments.

In classical Greece, several female statues wear a crossed band over their shoulders and across the breast, as in the famous statue of the charioteer at Delphi. The Odyssey and Iliad mention women’s undergarments, as does Herodotus, Aristophanes, and the later Hellenistic writer Lacian (Ewing 1972). In these texts, women are described as wearing a band of linen known as the zoné around the waist and lower torso to shape and control them. Other Greek words also appear to describe women’s undergarments, including the apodesmos (meaning a band, breast band, or girdle), mastodeton (or breast band, which actually flattens the bust) and, occasionally, mastodesmos (with a similar meaning) (Ewing 1972). These garments appear to presage the bra as well as the corset.

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A famous Roman mosaic from A.D. 400 shows several women wearing what appear to be bikinis or briefs

Roman women followed Greek fashion closely. The Roman poet Martial describes a cestus, which is similar to the Greek zoné but wider, and Cicero also mentions a strophium or breast band. Other Roman terms describing women’s underclothing include the mamillere and fascia, which were tight bands of cloth that primarily supported the bust rather than the abdomen. A famous mosaic from A.D. 400 shows several women wearing what appear to be bikinis or briefs (Ewing 1972). For both the Greeks and the Romans, underclothing (which sometimes was worn as outer clothing as well) was designed more for function than exclusively aesthetic reasons.

In France in particular, the Middle Ages saw the rise of French lingerie with the introduction of the chemise in the fourth century. However, it wasn’t until the fourteenth century that lingerie began to be used as a shaping garment in France with the introduction of the cotte – a stiff piece of linen that was slipped under the bodice to flatten out the breast.

Since Elizabethan times and the introduction of the corset, the French have been at the forefront of designing gorgeous and sexy underwear. What’s more, during the French Revolution, French women rejected the fashionable corset for more loose fitting underwear with only an inbuilt bustier.
The French Revolution in the late 1700s also revolutionized women’s lingerie. French women begin discarding petticoats, corsets, and camisoles as symbols of French aristocracy in favor of the “un-corset,” or a type of corset without stiffening. In a deliberate return to classic Greece, the birthplace of the freedom that revolutionary France was proclaiming, women sometimes would wear a band wrapped around the body similar to the Greek zoné under slim, high-waisted muslins that echoed Grecian rounded breasts and well-rounded figures (Ewing 1972).

The term lingerie was originally introduced into the English language in the 1850s. However, rather than simply describing ‘washables’ as it does in French, the English adoption of the word brought with it an implication of undergarments that were scandalous and sexy.

“Without proper foundations, there can be no fashion.” Christian Dior

Of course, lingerie has been around a lot longer than the usage of the word; it was first evident in Ancient Egypt according to hieroglyphic representations. Clothing in 3000 BCE was considered to carry a certain degree of status, with only the very privileged wearing undergarments to mould the shape of their silhouette – not so dissimilar to today’s society.

In the hundreds of years that have followed, lingerie has been used to shape women’s bodies in all sorts of interesting shapes, according to the fashion at the time.

Lingerie is a big industry in France, with women spending an average of 20% of their style budget every year on these silken goods. Classic French style is timeless, chic and always polished. Just think of modern day style icon Marion Cotillard. So often Cotillard wears simple lines in classic black and white and yet the contrast in shades gives her look a modern yet understated elegance.

 

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http://www.myfrenchlife.org/2014/08/14/french-lingerie-brief-history/

Go ahead, mention them: A touring show on the history of French lingerie

Ewing, Elizabeth. 1976. Underwear: A History. New York, NY: Theatre Arts Books.

Kunzle, David. 2004. Fashion and Fetishism: Corsets, Tight-Lacing and Other Forms of Body—Sculpture. Thrupp, UK: Sutton Publishing Limited.

Steele, Valerie. 2001. The Corset: A Cultural History. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Workman, Nancy. 1996. “From Victorian to Victoria’s Secret: The Foundations of Modern Erotic Wear. Journal of Popular Culture. 30.2, 61-73.

Art Nouveau

Art Nouveau  Started: 1890

Ended: 1905

Art Nouveau emerged in England and spread throughout Europe and the United States. In Germany, it was called Judendstil, Sezession in Austria and Modernismo in Spain. Art Nouveau artists broke up with the 19th century historicism and used the world around them as a source of inspiration. Most artists turned to the natural world but they often also chosen erotic themes. The style flourished from 1890 to about 1910 when it was replaced by other modernist styles such as Expressionism and surrealism.

The desire to abandon the historical styles of the nineteenth century was an important impetus behind Art Nouveau and one that establishes the movement’s modernism. Industrial production was, at that point, widespread, and yet the decorative arts were increasingly dominated by poorly-made objects imitating earlier periods. 

“Color in certain places has the great value of making the outlines and structural planes seem more energetic.”        Antoni Gaudi

Artists drew inspiration from both organic and geometric forms, evolving elegant designs that united flowing, natural forms resembling the stems and blossoms of plants. The emphasis on linear contours took precedence over color, which was usually represented with hues such as muted greens, browns, yellows, and blues.

7 of the Greatest Art Nouveau Art Pieces

 

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Reclining Woman with Green Stockings by Egon Schiele

        Gismonda by Alphonse Mucha

Education (Chittenden Memorial Window) by Louis Comfort Tiffany

 

         Sagrada Familia by Antoni Gaudi

 

The Kiss    “Art is a line around your thoughts.”     

 

The Dancer’s Reward (Salome) by Aubrey Beardsley                                                 

 

At the Moulin Rouge by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

                                                                      

The desire to abandon the historical styles of the nineteenth century was an important impetus behind Art Nouveau and one that establishes the movement’s modernism. Industrial production was, at that point, widespread, and yet the decorative arts were increasingly dominated by poorly-made objects imitating earlier periods. 

“Color in certain places has the great value of making the outlines and structural planes seem more energetic.”        Antoni Gaudi

Artists drew inspiration from both organic and geometric forms, evolving elegant designs that united flowing, natural forms resembling the stems and blossoms of plants. The emphasis on linear contours took precedence over color, which was usually represented with hues such as muted greens, browns, yellows, and blues.

http://historylists.org/art/7-greatest-art-nouveau-masterpieces.html

https://g.co/kgs/yI2ptO

sourced from  ~   http://www.theartstory.org/movement-art-nouveau.htm#key_ideas_header

Bauhaus~Naum Slutzky

 

Russian born Slutzky, was a Bauhaus school industrial designer, whose creations reflected the age of machine technology; precious metals were rejected as inflation prices in Germany soared at the time, forcing goldsmiths to turn to base metals instead. The resounding feature of Bauhaus design was process and function rather than the value of the materials.

Slutzky studied engineering and fine art in Vienna, the two disciplines evident in his work. He started working as a goldsmith at the Wiener Werkstatte between 1912-13 before undertaking engineering studies (1914-19) at the Technical High School, along with formal artistic training at the Viennese Art School. .

In December 1919, Slutzky was invited by Walter Gropius to be an assistant in the metal and goldsmithing workshops of the Weimar Bauhaus, working with Christian Dell and Laslo Moholy-Nagy. In 1922 he was asked to lead the workshop for metalwork at the Bauhaus School and became a master goldsmith. . Between 1927 and 1933, he practised as an interior designer, lighting consultant and goldsmith for the retailer, Kaufmann of Hamburg.

Having been forced to flee to Britain from Germany in 1933 he carried on to have a rich and successful career and taught in many prestigious institutes After the war, from 1946-50, he was a tutor in jewellery design at the London, Central School of Arts and Crafts and from 1950-57, he was a lecturer in Product Design in the Department of Industrial Design at the Royal College of Art. He spent the final years of his career as Senior Lecturer in Product Design at the Birmingham School of Arts and Crafts (1957-64) and Professor of Industrial Design at Ravensbourne College of Art, Bromley (1965)..

He was distinguished as being one of the most original jewellers to be associated with the Bauhaus. His work is characterised by simple geometric elegance, where designs are stripped to the bare minimum with engineering playing a subtle but vital role. He died on the 4th of November, 1965.

A silver Modernist design ring, 1965, the shank fitted with three irregular oblong silver bars, approx size N/O, with Slutzky’s stamp to reverse, together with a copper and silvered metal maquette of a similar design ring. An identical ring is held at the V&A (Victoria & Albert Museum) location Jewellery, room 91, case 43, shelf B, box 10.

Two rings one the prototype for a design and the second the finished article – show not only the workings and originality that often wouldn’t been seen but, also shows how closely his original ideas became final pieces.

Further examples of Slutzky work including jewellery and a teapot are held in the Victoria & Albert collections, all were acquired from Gesche Ochs; who became an important patron to his work in the 1920s.

The collection is a beautiful insight into the art movement that revolutionised 20th century design.

Forced to flee to Britain from Germany in 1933, he first started working as a designer for the well established Birmingham lighting firm, Best and Lloyd but by the following year, he was a employed as an art teacher at the progressive school, Dartington Hall, in Totnes, Devon where he remained until 1940. After the war, from 1946-50, he was a tutor in jewellery design at the London, Central School of Arts and Crafts and from 1950-57, he was a lecturer in Product Design in the Department of Industrial Design at the Royal College of Art. He spent the final years of his career as Senior Lecturer in Product Design at the Birmingham School of Arts and Crafts (1957-64) and Professor of Industrial Design at Ravensbourne College of Art, Bromley (1965).

He died on the 4th of November, 1965.

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Naum Slutzky

 

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=naum+slutzky+biography&client=safari&sa=X&rls=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ved=0ahUKEwim8NmCvMjSAhVJVZQKHVQqBq4QsAQIPw&biw=1408&bih=758

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naum_Slutzky

https://www.roseberys.co.uk/news/naum-slutzky-iconic-german-design/

Kat ~Lecture Series

I have chosen this course to explore all aspects of Fundamentals of Design Certificate 3 to hopefully specialise in an area of design I enjoy and gravitate towards naturally ; Interior Design, Graphic Design, Jewellery Design, Fashion Design.

When I complete the course I would like to continue on with Certificate 4 or a Diploma specialise in a particular area of Design, perhaps Graphic Design although Im not sure yet as I have never thought of myself as being creative.

In History and Theory of Design I am generally interested in Design origins and the theory behind Design from the early days in the 1950s to now and how it has evolved over time. I am finding Jewellery and Fashion Design of the past so interesting and inspiring.

Unfortunately I do not have any Design work to share with you.